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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

6 edition of William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1657-1737. found in the catalog.

William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1657-1737.

Norman Sykes

William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1657-1737.

by Norman Sykes

  • 48 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by University Press in Cambridge [Eng.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wake, William, 1657-1737

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: v. 2, p. 272-278.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX5199.W216 S9
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6242129M
    LC Control Number58001230
    OCLC/WorldCa823636

    Author: Wake, William, ; Format: Book; v. ; 23 cm. William Wake's Gallican correspondence and related documents, / edited by Leonard Adams | National Library of Australia National Library of Australia. Archbishop Wake ( - ) William Wake (Janu - Janu ), was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from until his death in Wake was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford/5(2).

    The first English translation of the Apostolic Fathers' works was published in , by William Wake (–), then rector of Westminster St James, later () Archbishop of Canterbury. It was virtually the only English translation available until the midth century. Since its publication many better manuscripts of the Apostolic Fathers. William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, By Norman Sykes. Two volumes. (New York: Cambridge University Press, Pp. xiii, ; , $). William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury from to , has had to wait over years for his biographer, in spite of the fact that his.

    About William Wake. William Wake (–) attended Christ Church, Oxford and became a priest in the Church of England. He held several posts as a clergyman, and was appointed dean of Exeter in He became bishop of Lincoln in , and appointed archbishop of Canterbury in —a position he held until his death in William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, by Norman Sykes William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, by Norman Sykes (pp. ) Review by: Winthrop S. Hudson.


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William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1657-1737 by Norman Sykes Download PDF EPUB FB2

WAKE, WILLIAM (–), archbishop of Canterbury, born at Blandford in Dorset on 26 Jan. –7, was the son of William Wake (d. ) of Shapwick in the same county. His father was a man of considerable property and ancient family [see Wake, Sir Isaac].Children: 4 other daughters Wake, Ethelred Benett, Magdalene Churchill.

Get this from a library. William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, [Norman Sykes]. William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, [Sykes, Norman] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, Author: Norman Sykes. William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, by Sykes, Norman, Publication date Topics Wake, William, Internet Archive Books.

Uploaded by stationcebu on Aug SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) Pages: William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, by Norman Sykes (Book); A letter to the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury: proving that His Grace cannot be the author of the letter to an eminent Presbyterian clergyman in Swisserland [sic]: in which the present state of religion, in England, is blackened and exposed, and the present ministry are misrepresented and traduced by Thomas.

Wake regarded the Church of England as a via media between Rome and Geneva, but recommended changes in the Prayer Book to meet the scruples of Nonconformists. See J.H. Lupton, Archbishop Wake and the Project of Union () (); and N. Sykes, William Wake, Archbishop of .William Wake: Archbishop of Canterbury, / by Norman Sykes University Press Cambridge [Eng.] Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

William Wake (Wake, William, ) A Wikipedia article about this author is available. Wake, William,ed.: The Apocryphal Books of the New Testament (Philadelphia: Gebbie and Co., c), also ed.

by William Hone and Jeremiah Jones (multiple formats at. Author:William Wake () William Wake (–) sister projects: Wikipedia article, Commons category, Wikidata item. British Anglican priest; Archbishop of Canterbury William Wake Works Books.

State of the Church and Clergy of England "Wake, William," in Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed. Canterbury, William Wake, (Archbishop of) () W., W. (William Wake) () Wake, William, [ Book, Microform: ] View online (access conditions) At 5 libraries.

This resource is very relevant to your query (score: 91,) Municipum ecclesiasticum, or, The rights, liberties, and authorities of the. Archbishop Wake CE Primary School is named after Blandford's own Archbishop of Canterbury, William Wake ( - ).

After a long and distinguished career in the church, William provided funding before his death for a school to be opened and educate twelve boys in Blandford. Extract. Wake, William (–), archbishop of Canterbury, was born on 26 January at Blandford Forum, Dorset, the son of Colonel William Wake (–), a royalist army officer, and his wife, Amie, the daughter of Edward Cutler.

Taylor, S. () Wake, William (–), archbishop of Canterbury. In: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, UK, pp. Full text not archived in this repository. It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work.

See Guidance on citing. WAKE, WILLIAM (–), archbishop of Canterbury, born at Blandford in Dorset on 26 Jan. –7, was the son of William Wake (d. ) of Shapwick in the same county. His father was a man of considerable property and ancient family [see Wake, Sir Isaac].

Wake, William () Archbishop of Canterbury This page summarises records created by this Person The summary includes a brief description of the collection(s) (usually including the covering dates of the collection), the name of the archive where they are.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Transcribed from the original manuscript of William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury, and edited by his great grandaughter Etheldred Benett Includes bibliographical referencesPages: William Wake (26 January – 24 January ), was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from until his death in Life.

Wake was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford. A Treatise on Oaths by a Prominent Anglican Priest, Later Archbishop of Canterbury Wake, William A Practical Discourse Concerning Swearing: Especially in the Two Great Points of Perjury and Common-Swearing.

London: Printed for Richard Sare, ii, xxix i.e. xlv, 15, pp. Lacking blank leaf preceding title page, text : William Wake.

The accession of William Wake () to the primacy of Great Britain in was hailed by Protestants all over Europe. Lutheran and Reformed theologians came to see Wake not only as the wisest choice the Anglican Church could have made but also as another great apostle of Christian unity.

William Wake (26 January – 24 January ) was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from until his death in Contents. 1 Life; 2 Manuscripts collection; 3 References; 4 External links; Life Wake was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, and educated at Christ Church, took orders, and in went to Paris as chaplain to the ambassador Author: Reformation.

The Shepherd of Hermas, eventually excluded from the New Testament canon, appeared in Bibles as late at the mid-4 th-century Codex translations of Archbishop Wake (–) are found in The Lost Books of the Bible (), collected by William Hone.

The Shepherd of the title, identified as the angel of repentance, does not appear in the first book.William Wake (26 January – 24 January ) was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from until his death in Though no author is given, this work presented for sale is attributed to William Wake (), an Anglican priest and Archbishop of Canterbury from until his death in Wake's writings are numerous, the chief being his 'State of the Church and Clergy of .